COVID-19 Update : To protect your safety and the safety of our firm members, we are available to continue providing legal services via phone conferences and FaceTime. The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting employment in very significant ways. You have rights that are covered by laws already in existence and laws being passed by Congress and the Texas Legislature. Very soon, we will be posting a summary and FAQ on Corona Virus / COVID-19 that will provide guidance to those who have lost their jobs, remain employed or are searching for employment. Please check back to this site regularly for updates or call now to speak with an attorney about your rights.

COVID-19 Update : To protect your safety and the safety of our firm members, we are available to continue providing legal services via phone conferences and FaceTime. The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting employment in very significant ways. You have rights that are covered by laws already in existence and laws being passed by Congress and the Texas Legislature. Very soon, we will be posting a summary and FAQ on Corona Virus / COVID-19 that will provide guidance to those who have lost their jobs, remain employed or are searching for employment. Please check back to this site regularly for updates or call now to speak with an attorney about your rights.

Looking Out For Your Career

Steps to dealing with sexual harassment on the job

| May 8, 2020 | Workplace Harassment

Sexual harassment is an ongoing problem for people in Texas and across the United States. Even though greater attention is being paid to these behaviors through the #MeToo movement, people continue to have their employee rights violated. Often, workers are unaware of the actions available to them to put a stop to it and recover compensation.

Sexual harassment can range from off-color jokes to inappropriate touching and aggressive attempts to start a personal relationship. Employees should know what steps they can take to stop sexual harassment. Many people are reluctant to complain about being harassed for fear of retribution. Some people are not even cognizant that their behavior is offensive. Telling the person that the behavior is offensive could put a stop to it before it goes any further.

Employers may have procedures if sexual harassment takes place. The victim should follow the rules for dealing with sexual harassment. Time constraints to make a complaint should be understood and adhered to. If the company does not have a procedure, the supervisor should be informed. Records as to the incident, who committed it and the behaviors that were offensive should be maintained.

If the results are still unsatisfactory, there are government agencies that can help. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is one such entity. The claim will be investigated and it could be resolved in that way. Finally, if the behavior continues or is so severe that there are no alternatives, a legal filing could help. Compensation might include being reinstated if there was termination, recovery of lost pay and benefits, pain and suffering, requiring the employer to have policies to stop sexual harassment, and legal fees. Discussing the case with a legal professional experienced in sexual harassment cases may provide information on how to proceed.