COVID-19 Update : To protect your safety and the safety of our firm members, we are available to continue providing legal services via phone conferences and FaceTime. The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting employment in very significant ways. You have rights that are covered by laws already in existence and laws being passed by Congress and the Texas Legislature. Very soon, we will be posting a summary and FAQ on Corona Virus / COVID-19 that will provide guidance to those who have lost their jobs, remain employed or are searching for employment. Please check back to this site regularly for updates or call now to speak with an attorney about your rights.

COVID-19 Update : To protect your safety and the safety of our firm members, we are available to continue providing legal services via phone conferences and FaceTime. The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting employment in very significant ways. You have rights that are covered by laws already in existence and laws being passed by Congress and the Texas Legislature. Very soon, we will be posting a summary and FAQ on Corona Virus / COVID-19 that will provide guidance to those who have lost their jobs, remain employed or are searching for employment. Please check back to this site regularly for updates or call now to speak with an attorney about your rights.

Looking Out For Your Career

How companies use noncompete agreements

| Mar 31, 2020 | Noncompete Agreements

It’s not uncommon for Texas employers to ask new workers to sign noncompete agreements at the time of hire. Although such agreements are legal, the way they are written controls as to whether they are enforceable. Furthermore, laws governing noncompete agreements may vary from state to state.

Employers require new hires to sign noncompete agreements in order to protect them from the employee signing on with a competitor or starting a competitive related business. These are contracts that may have limitations as far as geography and time are concerned. However, those same documents cannot prohibit employees from working in their chosen careers.

Employees may question the enforceability of the agreements they have signed and may wonder whether they are legally binding. Courts have chosen to uphold or void noncompete agreements depending on the verbiage within. Sometimes, courts may decide to re-write some of the questionable or illegal clauses. However, courts tend not to change what has already been written.

Texas workers may not want to leave their noncompete agreements to chance. By the time employees review the agreements they have already signed, they may discover that they entered into agreements that are difficult, if not impossible, to abandon.

One way to stay protected against the future ramifications of a noncompete agreement is to ask an attorney to review documents before signing them. An experienced lawyer might be able to explain the details of a document. Choosing not to have attorney review may result in dire consequences, such as being prohibited to work in one’s current profession.