Many workers in Texas are asked to sign some type of employment agreement. If one isn’t required to sign a formal contract, their relationship with the employer may be governed by company policies or state employment laws. Employment agreements typically include several terms, such as the date that it is to take effect.

A contract will likely specify whether an individual is being hired on a part-time, full-time or seasonal basis. It may also specify whether a worker is being paid by the hour or getting a predetermined salary. A severability clause might be included in a contract, and this type of clause allows a contract to remain intact even if one or more specific sections are later determined to be invalid.

Employment agreements may have language that determines how disputes are to be settled. It isn’t uncommon for employers to require that disagreements be settled in mediation or arbitration. A contract is also likely to contain procedures for terminating a deal if either side wishes to withdraw from it. Furthermore, employment contracts often include confidentiality clauses or other clauses that restrict a person’s ability to work with a competitor if the agreement is terminated.

An employment law attorney can review employment contracts before they go into effect. This may help an individual better understand their rights and responsibilities under such an agreement. Legal counsel could review a contract after it is signed to determine if some or all of its clauses can be enforced. Employers may also wish to have an attorney look at their employment contracts to make sure that they are valid under state or federal law.